Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Since learning how to make jam nearly four years ago, I’ve felt empowered in the kitchen.  Empowered like I somehow managed to decode the cipher of the modern grocery store.  Realizing how simple it is to make things like jam, pickles, ricotta cheese, and mustard from scratch has really pulled back the curtain on modern conveniences.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Admittedly, I don’t churn every tablespoon of butter I cook with, nor do I grind every cup of flour I bake with.  In our modern world, and given my work schedule, it’s just not reasonable to come home from a day at the office and start emulsifying oil and eggs, kneading dough, and slicing some home-cured bacon, just to make BLTs for dinner.

But, there is a real sense of accomplishment and satisfaction in demystifying a typically-store-bought product.  Mastering the marshmallow was, to me, as fulfilling as receiving my first set of good teaching evaluations — and it blows the minds of your dinner guests.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

This recipe uses dried rosehips — the berry-shaped fruit of the rose plant — to provide a floral sweetness to these marshmallows.  Rosehips can be found at most natural grocers or health food stores, as they are frequently used as a tea.  But grinding the rosehips to a powder evenly disperses their honeysuckle-like flavor throughout the fluffy marshmallows.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

The recipe has a fair number of steps that need to be worked quickly in order.  So read all the way through it and get all of your ingredients and equipment set up before you start heating anything.  I think the most critical step is the high speed mixing — insufficient volume expansion will give you tough, rubbery marshmallows, rather than soft, springy treats.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Rosehip Marshmallows

Makes ~25 large marshmallows | Cook time 30 minutes + 6 hours to set | Adapted from Marshmallow Madness

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp dried rosehips
  • 2 packets powdered gelatin
  • 1/2 + 1/4 C water
  • 3/4 C granulated sugar
  • 1/4 + 1/4 C light corn syrup
  • cornstarch for coating

Directions

  1. Lightly grease an 8″x8″ pan and set aside.  Grind rosehips to fine grind (granulated sugar sized particles or smaller) and set aside.
  2. In a microwave-safe bowl, combine gelatin and 1/2 C water.  Stir until combined and you’ve broken up the chunks of gelatin.  Let gelatin soften for 5 minutes.
  3. Combine sugar, ground rosehips, 1/4 C corn syrup, and remaining 1/4 C water, in a small saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until mixture reaches 240°F (note this happens quickly, so know what your next steps are and be ready to go while this mixture is coming to temperature).
  4. While mixture is coming to temperature, microwave gelatin for 30 seconds to melt it.  Pour remaining 1/4 C corn syrup and the melted gelatin into bowl of stand mixer.  Turn the mixer to low and keep it running.
  5. Once the sugar mixture has reached 240°F, remove it from stove and immediately begin pouring it in to running mixer bowl.  Turn mixer to medium speed, and let it run for 5 minutes.
  6. Turn mixer to medium-high speed, and run another 5 minutes.  Turn mixer to highest speed, and run another 2 minutes until marshallows have tripled in volume (the larger the volume expansion you can get, the softer and fluffier your marshmallows will be).
  7. Pour marshmallows into prepared 8″x8″ pan, and smooth out the top with a rubber spatula.  Generously sprinkle the top surface with cornstarch, then let the marshmallows set for 6 hours or overnight.  If setting for more than 6 hours, cover with cling wrap once the top surface has firmed up and will not adhere to the wrap.
  8. Turn marshmallows out onto a cutting surface, then use cookie cutters, a pizza cutter, or a pastry cutter, to cut marshmallows.  Toss marshmallows into a zip-top bag, add cornstarch, seal bag, and shake to coat cut surfaces of marshmallows with cornstarch.
  9. Keep marshmallows in air-tight container up to 1 week.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

Share the love! Pin on Pinterest222Share on Yummly0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on Tumblr0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on StumbleUpon0Digg thisShare on Reddit0Email this to someone